Being an environmentalist sometimes gets a bad rap

being an environmentalistBeing an environmentalist sometimes gets a bad rap

Miranda Cain - guest contributor

Sometimes being an environmentalist gets a bad rap, but not all environmental gurus are extremists. In fact, most Americans are just coming to grips with the idea of conserving the planet for future generations and promoting the idea that humans, as the dominant species on Earth, have the responsibility to maintain the health of the planet.
As populations rise, the idea of being mindful of waste and usage of natural resources is growing in popularity—and not just among tree huggers, but among young and old alike, community members are concerned about the wasteful nature of our daily lives.
More and more people are taking it upon themselves to help out the world in small but meaningful ways. They do things like walk to the grocery store, use canvas bags for errands around town instead of plastic ones, take shorter showers and buy food locally.
What being green really comes down to is a respect for this place that all of us call home. It’s not about a political party, it’s not about time or money; it’s about maintaining something that our survival depends on—this planet, the water, the air, and the food supply.
Ask yourselves these questions: Can this milk jug be recycled? Did I turn off the lights before leaving? Can I take a shorter shower or turn off the faucet while brushing my teeth? Is composting or recycling possible at my house or in my neighborhood?
Odds are that you answered yes to most of those questions. Make those changes! You don’t have to make big changes—you just have to make small tweaks to your routine and you’ll be contributing to big results.

Being an environmentalist sometimes gets a bad rap

Robin Wade